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Radarr Settings


Media Management

Note: Some of these settings are only visible through 'show advanced' settings which is on the top bar under the search bar


Movie Naming

Commonly used naming schema are:

  • Standard Movie Format
{Movie Title} {(Release Year)} {Edition Tags} {[Quality Full]} {[MediaInfo 3D]} {[MediaInfo VideoDynamicRange]} [{MediaInfo VideoBitDepth}bit] {[MediaInfo VideoCodec]} {[MediaInfo AudioCodec}-{MediaInfo AudioChannels]}{MediaInfo AudioLanguages}{-Release Group} 

which would then output: The Movie Title! (2010) Ultimate Extended Edition [Bluray-1080p Proper] [3D] [HDR] [10bit] [x264] [DTS-5.1][DE]-EVOLVE. This allows critical data such as the group and Quality (source) to be maintained within the file name in case of database loss or corruption

  • Movie Folder Format

{Movie Title} ({Release Year}) {tmdb-{tmdbid}} {imdb-{imdbid}} which would then output: The Movie Title! (2010) {tmdb-345691} {imdb-tt0066921}

  • Rename Movies - If this is toggled off (no check in the box) Radarr will use the existing file name if renaming is disabled
  • Replace Illegal Characters - If this is toggled off (no check in the box) Radarr will replace illegal characters.
Example: \ # / $ * < > just to name a few
  • Colon (:) Replacement - This setting will dictate how Radarr handles colons within the movie file.
    This is only available when Replace Illegal Characters is toggled on (check in the box)
    • Delete - Self explanatory
      • Example: Movie,The.mkv -> MovieThe.mkv
    • Replace with Dash - Removes the colon and adds a dash in its place
      • Example: Movie,The.mkv -> Movie-The.mkv
    • Replace with Space - Removes the colon and adds a space in its place
      • Example: Movie,The.mkv -> Movie The.mkv
    • Replace with Space Dash Space - self explanatory
      • Example: Movie,The.mkv -> Movie - The.mkv
Standard Movie Format

Here you will select the naming convention for the actual movie files

  • Dropdown Box (upper right corner)
    • Left Box - Space Handling
      • Space ( ) - Use spaces in naming (Default)
      • Period (.) - Use periods in lieu of spaces in naming
      • Underscore (_) - Use underscores in lieu of spaces in naming
      • Dash (-) - Use dashes in lieu of spaces in naming
    • Right Box - Case Handling
      • Default Case - Make title upper and lower Case (~camelcase) (Default)
      • Upper Case - Make title all upper case
      • Lower Case - Make title all lower case
Movie Naming
Input Result
{Movie Title} Movie Name!
{Movie TitleThe} Movie Name, The
{Movie Collection} The Movie Collection
{Release Year} 2020
{Movie CleanTitle} Movie Name
{Movie TitleFirstCharacter} M
{Movie Certification} PG-13
Movie IDs
Input Result
{ImdbId} tt12345
{Tmdbid} 123456
Quality (Naming)
Input Result
{Quality Full} HDTV 720p Proper
{Quality Title} HDTV 720p
Media Info
Input Result
{MediaInfo Simple} x264 DTS
{MediaInfo VideoCodec} x264
{MediaInfo AudioChannels} 5.1
{MediaInfo SubtitleLanguages} [EN]
{MediaInfo VideoBitDepth} 8
{MediaInfo Full} x264 DTS [EN+DE]
{MediaInfo AudioCodec} DTS
{MediaInfo AudioLanguages} [EN+DE]
{MediaInfo VideoCodec} x264
{MediaInfo VideoDynamicRange} HDR
Edition
Input Result
{Edition Tags} IMAX
Custom Formats
Input Result
{Custom Formats} Surround Sound x264
Original
Input Result
{Original Title} Movie.Title.HDTV.x264.EVOLVE
{Original Filename} Movie.title.hdtv.x264.EVOLVE
Standard Movie Folder Format

This is where you will set the naming convention for the folder that contains the video file

Movie Naming
Input Result
{Movie Title} Movie Name!
{Movie TitleThe} Movie Name, The
{Movie Collection} The Movie Collection
{Release Year} 2020
{Movie CleanTitle} Movie Name
{Movie TitleFirstCharacter} M
{Movie Certification} PG-13
Movie IDs
Input Result
{ImdbId} tt12345
{Tmdbid} 123456


Folders

Only visible with advanced toggled

  • Create Empty Media folders - This will create an empty folder during disk scan
  • Delete Empty Folders - This will remove any empty folders during disk scan

Importing

  • Skip Free Space Check - Use when Radarr is unable to detect free space from your movies root folder
Only visible with advanced toggled
  • Minimum Free Space - Toggling this will prevent import if it would leave less than this amount of disk space available
Only visible with advanced toggled
  • Use Hardlinks instead of Copy - Use Hardlinks when trying to copy files from torrents that are still being seeded (for more information on this click HERE)
Only visible with advanced toggled
  • Import Extra Files - Import matching extra files (subtitles, nfo, etc) after importing a file


File Management

  • Ignore Deleted Movies - Movies deleted from disk are automatically unmonitored in Radarr
  • Download Proper & Repacks - Should Radarr automatically upgrade to propers when available? (see link for explanation on Proper and Repack)
  • Analyse video files - Extract file information such as resolution, runtime and codec information from files. This requires Radarr to read parts of the file which may cause high disk or network activity during scans.
  • Rescan Movie Folder after Refresh
    • Always - This will rescan the movies folder based upon Tasks Schedule
    • After Manual Refresh - You will have to manually rescanning the disk
    • Never - Just as it says, NEVER
  • Change File Date
    • None - Radarr will not change the date that shows in your given file browser
    • In Cinimas - The date the video was in cinemas
    • Physical release date - The date the video was released on disc/streaming
  • Recycling Bin - Designate a location for deleted files to go to (just in case you want to retrieve them before the bin is taken out)
  • Recycling Bin Cleanup - This is how old a given file can be before it is deleted permanently


Permissions

  • Set Permissions - This will allow Radarr to set the given file permission when a given file is imported or renamed
  • File chmod mode - This is the permission level that Radarr will set for a given file on import or rename (more information HERE)


Root Folders

  • Path - This shows the path to your media
  • Free Space - This is the free space being reported to Radarr from the system
  • Unmapped Folders - ??
  • The X at the end - This will remove this given root path
  • Add folder - This allows you to select a root path for a place to either place new downloads into this folder or to allow Radarr to scan existing media


Profiles


Quality Profiles

  • Here you'll be allowed to set profiles for which you can have for the quality of movie you're looking to download
  • When selecting an existing profile or adding an additional profile a new window will appear
    Note: The quality with the blue box will be the quality that is set for Upgrade Until (basically the cutoff)
    • Name - Here you'll select a UNIQUE name for the profile to which you are creating
    • Upgrades allowed - If you tell Radarr to download a Web 1080p as it is the first release of a specific movie then later somebody is able to upload a Bluray-1080p then with this selected Radarr will automatically upgrade to the better quality
      Note: This is only if you have Bluray-1080p higher than Web 1080p within the Qualities section and both are selected
    • Upgrade until Quality - Here you'll set the cut-off to which Radarr says to its self, "This is as high of quality that you want. I won't be looking anymore for better quality releases."
    • Minimum Custom Format Score - The minimum sum of custom format(s) for a release to be downloaded. Note this does not outrank qualities, but is ranked after qualities.
    • Upgrade Until Custom Format Score - Similar to Upgrade until Quality; the minimum score to be reached within a quality to upgrade to. Once this is reached, there will be no upgrades within that quality due to custom formats.
    • Language - Select your preferred language
    • Custom Format - Radarr scores each release using the sum of scores for matching custom formats. If a new release would improve the score, at the same or better quality, then Radarr will grab it.
      • For more details on Custom Formats click HERE
    • Qualities - For definitions for qualities please click HERE
    • Edit Groups - Some qualities are grouped together to reduce the size of the list as well grouping like releases, Prime example of this is WebDL and WebRip as these are very similar and typically have similar bitrates. When editing the groups you can change the preference within each of the groups.
      • Qualities higher in the list are more preferred. Qualities within the same group are equal. Only checked qualities are wanted
        Note: By default the qualities are set from lowest (bottom) to highest (top)


Delay Profiles

  • Delay profiles allow you to reduce the number of releases that will be downloaded for an Movie, by adding a delay while Radarr will continue to watch for releases that better match your preferences.
    • Protocol - This will either be Usenet or Torrent depending on which download protocol you're using
    • Usenet Delay - Set by the number of minutes you'll want to wait before the download to start
    • Torrent Delay - Set by the number of minutes you'll want to wait before the download to start
    • Tags - This is where you'll select any relevant tags that you'll be using for this scheme
  • Wrench icon - This will allow you to edit the delay profile
  • Plus icon - Create a new profile

Example: Some media will receive half a dozen different releases of varying quality in the hours after a release, and without delay profiles Radarr might try to download all of them. With delay profiles, Radarr can be configured to ignore the first few hours of releases.

Delay profiles are also helpful if you want to emphasize one protocol (Usenet or BitTorrent) over the other. (See Example 3)

How Delay Profiles Work

The timer begins as soon as Radarr detects an Movie has a release available. This release will show up in your Queue with a clock icon to indicate that it is under a delay.

During the delay period, any new releases that become available will be noted by Radarr. When the delay timer expires, Radarr will download the single release which best matches your quality preferences.

The timer period can be different for Usenet and Torrents. Each profile can be associated with one or more tags to allow you to customize which shows have which profiles. A delay profile with no tag is considered the default and applies to all shows that do not have a specific tag.

Examples

For each example, assume the user has the follow quality profile active: HDTV 720p and above are allowed WebDL 720p is the quality cutoff * WebDL 1080p is the highest ranked quality

Example 1:

In this simple example, the profile is set with a 120 minute (two hour) delay for both Usenet and Torrent.

At 11:00pm the first release for an Movie is detected by Radarr and the 120 minute clock begins. At 1:00am, Radarr will evaluate any releases it has found in the past two hours, and download the best one, which is WebDL 720p.

At 3:00am another release is found, which is WebDL 720p. Another 120 minute clock begins. At 5:00am the best-available release is downloaded. Since the cutoff is now reached, the Movie no longer monitored and Radarr will stop looking for new releases.

At any point, if a WebDL 1080p release is found, it will be downloaded immediately because it is the highest-ranking quality. If there is a delay timer currently active it will be cancelled.

Example 2:

This example has different timers for Usenet and Torrents. Assume a 120 minute timer for Usenet and a 180 minute timer for BitTorrent.

At 11:00pm the first release for an Movie is detected by Radarr and both timers begin. At 1:00am, Radarr will evaluate any releases, and if there are any acceptable Usenet releases, the best one will be downloaded and both timers will end. If not, Radarr will wait until 2:00am and download the best release, regardless of which source it came from.

Example 3:

A common use for delay profiles is to emphasize one protocol over another. For example, you might only want to download a BitTorrent release if nothing has been uploaded to Usenet after a certain amount of time.

You could set a 60 minute timer for BitTorrent, and a 0 minute timer for Usenet.

If the first release that is detected is from Usenet, Radarr will download it immediately.

If the first release is from BitTorrent, Radarr will set a 60 minute timer. If any qualifying Usenet release is detected during that timer, the BitTorrent release will be ignored and the Usenet release will be grabbed.

Quality


Quality Table Meanings

  • Title - The name of the Quality in the GUI (configurable)
  • Max - The maximum Megabytes per Minute (MB/min) a quality can have.
  • Megabytes Per Minute - Self Explanatory
  • Min - The minimum Megabytes per Minute (MB/min) a quality can have.
  • Preferred - The preferred Megabytes per Minute (MB/min) a quality can have.
  • Quality - The scene quality name (hardcoded)
  • Size Limit - Self Explanatory


Qualities Defined

  • Unknown - Self Explanatory
  • WORKPRINT - A workprint of a film generally contains timecode and usually has watermarks from the studio involved in the production of the film. These "proxy" copies of a film often go between the editorial and visual effects departments of the film crew. A workprint may be of any resolution, but are generally lower quality versions of the film used to show progress on the editorial or post-production process. Therefore, these may not be at all the same as a theatrical version of the film, and may be missing many of the visual effects or audio that end up making it to the theatrical release.
  • CAM - is a theater rip usually done with a digital video camera. A mini tripod is sometimes used, but a lot of the time this won't be feasible, so the camera may shake. Seating placement isn't always ideal, and it might be filmed from an awkward angle. If cropped properly, this is hard to tell unless there's text on the screen, but a lot of times these are left with triangular borders on the top and bottom of the screen. Sound is taken from the onboard microphone of the camera, and especially in comedies, laughter can often be heard during the film. Due to these factors picture and sound quality are usually quite poor, but sometimes we're lucky, and the theater will be fairly empty and a fairly clear signal will be heard.
  • TELESYNC - is the same spec as a CAM except it uses an external audio source (most likely an audio jack in the chair for the disabled). A direct audio source does not guarantee good quality audio, as a lot of background noise can interfere. Sometimes a telesync is filmed in an empty cinema or from the projection booth with a professional camera, giving better picture quality. Quality ranges drastically. A high percentage of telesyncs are CAMs that have been mislabeled.
  • TELECINE - A telecine machine copies the film digitally from the reels. Sound and picture should be very good, but due to the equipment and cost involved telecines are fairly uncommon. Generally, the film will be in correct aspect ratio, although 4:3 telecines have existed. TC should not be confused with TimeCode, which is a visible counter on screen throughout the film.
  • REGIONAL - <--------------------- Needs definition
  • DVDSCR - A pre-release DVD often sent to awards judges and various other places for promotional use. A screener is supplied on a DVD or other large enough media. The main draw back is a “ticker” (a message that scrolls past at the bottom of the screen, with the copyright and anti-copy telephone number). Also, if the screener contains any serial numbers, or any other markings that could lead to the source of the tape, these will have to be blocked, usually with a black mark over the section. This is sometimes only for a few seconds, but unfortunately on some copies this will last for the entire film, and some can be quite big. Depending on the equipment used, screener quality can range from excellent to very poor. Usually transferred to SVCD, DivX/XviD, or MP4.
  • SDTV - Post air rips from an analog source (usually cable television or OTA standard definition). The image quality is generally good (for the resolution) and they are usually encoded in DivX/XviD or MP4.
  • DVD - A re-encode of the final released DVD9. If possible this is released PRE retail. It should be excellent quality (for the resolution). DVDrips are usually released in DivX/XviD or MP4.
  • DVD-R - Same as DVD, but re-compressed to fit a single-layer DVD (generally reduces the original source bitrate by half, so the source material may have already been compressed from the original DVD copy and has been compressed a third time by the ripper).
  • WEBDL-480p - WEB-DL (P2P) refers to a file losslessly ripped from a streaming service, such as Netflix, Amazon Video, Hulu, Crunchyroll, Discovery GO, BBC iPlayer, etc., or downloaded via an online distribution website such as iTunes. The quality is quite good, since they are not reencoded. The video (H.264 or H.265) and audio (AC3/AAC) streams are usually extracted from the iTunes or Amazon Video and remuxed into a MKV container without sacrificing quality. An advantage with these releases is that, like BD/DVDRips, they usually have no onscreen network logos. These are nearly as good as a Blu-ray source but can suffer from audio lag or visual artifacts from the adaptive bitrate of streaming services. If a ripper's internet connection drops to a point where the bitrate lowers, the source bitrate could change dynamically, causing variations in picture quality. Most releases that suffer from an extreme amount of visual artifacts are NUKED and a PROPER is generally released to fix any wild variations in adaptive bitrate. This will be in 480p (SD) quality.
  • WEBRip-480p - In a WEB-Rip (P2P), the file is often extracted using the HLS or RTMP/E protocols and remuxed from a TS, MP4 or FLV container to MKV. This will be in 480p (SD) quality.
  • Bluray-480p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, downscaled to 480p resolution (720x480 @ 16:9, any other Aspect Ratio may be a different resolution). If possible this is released PRE retail. It should be excellent quality for the resolution. Bitrates may vary, but these are generally encoded to DivX, XviD, or AVC and offer the tradeoff of a small perceived quality reduction over the original source while drastically reducing filesize. These are generally MKV or MP4, but some DivX/XviD are around as well which use AVI.
  • Bluray-576p - Same as Bluray-480p, but in 576p (720x576). 576p is the standard PAL resolution for SDTV (although some manufacturers represent HDTV as anything above 480p, 576p offers barely any perceived quality increase over 480p). Bitrates may vary, but these are generally encoded to AVC or HEVC and offer the tradeoff of a small perceived quality reduction over the original source while drastically reducing filesize. These are generally MKV or MP4 container.
  • HDTV-720p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, but broadcast over HD cable or satellite (1280x720 @ 16:9, any other aspect ratio may be a different resolution). It may be modified for runtime or content depending on the network it came from. This is released usually several months after a retail release, but sometimes upscaled versions of a Standard Definition film are released on cable channels such as STARZ or HBO, and they would be the only HD copies of that specific film available. These are generally MKV or MP4.
  • WEBDL-720p - WEB-DL (P2P) refers to a file losslessly ripped from a streaming service, such as Netflix, Amazon Video, Hulu, Crunchyroll, Discovery GO, BBC iPlayer, etc., or downloaded via an online distribution website such as iTunes. The quality is quite good, since they are not reencoded. The video (H.264 or H.265) and audio (AC3/AAC) streams are usually extracted from the iTunes or Amazon Video and remuxed into a MKV container without sacrificing quality. An advantage with these releases is that, like BD/DVDRips, they usually have no onscreen network logos. These are nearly as good as a Blu-ray source but can suffer from audio lag or visual artifacts from the adaptive bitrate of streaming services. If a ripper's internet connection drops to a point where the bitrate lowers, the source bitrate could change dynamically, causing variations in picture quality. Most releases that suffer from an extreme amount of visual artifacts are NUKED and a PROPER is generally released to fix any wild variations in adaptive bitrate. This will be in 720p quality.
  • WEBRip-720p - In a WEB-Rip (P2P), the file is often extracted using the HLS or RTMP/E protocols and remuxed from a TS, MP4 or FLV container to MKV. This will be in 720p quality.
  • Bluray-720p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, downscaled to 720p resolution (1280x720 @ 16:9, any other aspect ratio may be a different resolution). If possible this is released PRE retail. It should be excellent quality for the resolution. Bitrates may vary, but these are generally encoded to AVC or HEVC and offer the tradeoff of a small perceived quality reduction over the original source while drastically reducing filesize. These are generally MKV or MP4 container.
  • HDTV-1080p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, but broadcast over HD cable or satellite (1920x1080 @ 16:9, any other aspect ratio may be a different resolution). It may be modified for runtime or content depending on the network it came from. This is released usually several months after a retail release, but sometimes upscaled versions of a Standard Definition film are released on cable channels such as STARZ or HBO, and they would be the only HD copies of that specific film available. These are generally MKV or MP4 container.
  • WEBDL-1080p - WEB-DL (P2P) refers to a file losslessly ripped from a streaming service, such as Netflix, Amazon Video, Hulu, Crunchyroll, Discovery GO, BBC iPlayer, etc., or downloaded via an online distribution website such as iTunes. The quality is quite good, since they are not reencoded. The video (H.264 or H.265) and audio (AC3/AAC) streams are usually extracted from the iTunes or Amazon Video and remuxed into a MKV container without sacrificing quality. An advantage with these releases is that, like BD/DVDRips, they usually have no onscreen network logos. These are nearly as good as a Blu-ray source but can suffer from audio lag or visual artifacts from the adaptive bitrate of streaming services. If a ripper's internet connection drops to a point where the bitrate lowers, the source bitrate could change dynamically, causing variations in picture quality. Most releases that suffer from an extreme amount of visual artifacts are NUKED and a PROPER is generally released to fix any wild variations in adaptive bitrate. This will be in 1080p quality.
  • WEBRip-1080p - In a WEB-Rip (P2P), the file is often extracted using the HLS or RTMP/E protocols and remuxed from a TS, MP4 or FLV container to MKV. This will be in 1080p quality.
  • Bluray-1080p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, at its native 1080p resolution (1920x1080 @ 16:9, any other aspect ratio may be a different resolution). If possible this is released PRE retail. It should be excellent quality and the same resolution as the source. Bitrates may vary, but these are generally encoded to AVC or HEVC and offer the tradeoff of a small perceived quality reduction over the original source while slightly reducing filesize. These are generally MKV or MP4 container.
  • Remux-1080p - A remux is a rip of a Blu-ray or HD DVD disc to another container format or just stripping the disc of menus and bonus material while keeping the contents of its audio and video streams intact (also keeping the current codecs), guaranteeing the exact 1:1 movie quality as on original disc. This is at 1080p quality.
  • HDTV-2160p - TVRip is a capture source from an capture card. HDTV stands for captured source from HD television. With an HDTV source, the quality can sometimes even surpass DVD. Movies in this format are starting to grow in popularity. Some advertisement and commercial banner can be seen on some releases during playback. This is at 2160p (4K) quality.
  • WEBDL-2160p - WEB-DL (P2P) refers to a file losslessly ripped from a streaming service, such as Netflix, Amazon Video, Hulu, Crunchyroll, Discovery GO, BBC iPlayer, etc., or downloaded via an online distribution website such as iTunes. The quality is quite good, since they are not reencoded. The video (H.264 or H.265) and audio (AC3/AAC) streams are usually extracted from the iTunes or Amazon Video and remuxed into a MKV container without sacrificing quality. An advantage with these releases is that, like BD/DVDRips, they usually have no onscreen network logos. These are nearly as good as a Blu-ray source but can suffer from audio lag or visual artifacts from the adaptive bitrate of streaming services. If a ripper's internet connection drops to a point where the bitrate lowers, the source bitrate could change dynamically, causing variations in picture quality. Most releases that suffer from an extreme amount of visual artifacts are NUKED and a PROPER is generally released to fix any wild variations in adaptive bitrate. This will be in 2160p (4K) quality.
  • WEBRip-2160p - In a WEB-Rip (P2P), the file is often extracted using the HLS or RTMP/E protocols and remuxed from a TS, MP4 or FLV container to MKV. This will be in 2160p (4k) quality.
  • Bluray-2160p - A re-encode of the final released Blu-ray, at its native 21600p resolution (3840x2160 @ 16:9, any other aspect ratio may be a different resolution). 4K versions of films that are released in generally HEVC codec and could be either 8-bit or 10-bit color reproduction or from an HDR source. slightly reducing filesize. These are generally MKV or MP4 container.
  • Remux-2160p - A remux is a rip of a Blu-ray or HD DVD disc to another container format or just stripping the disc of menus and bonus material while keeping the contents of its audio and video streams intact (also keeping the current codecs), guaranteeing the exact 1:1 movie quality as on original disc. This is at 2160p (4K) quality.
  • BR-DISK - The original Blu-ray disc, with it's AVC folder structure and no change in container format. Some media players are unable to deal with these, but they are generally used for archival purposes. The original Blu-ray disc content is unmodified. Most of the time, these have been run through an HDCP decryption process already via the ripper. Sometimes they are still encrypted.


Custom Formats

Custom formats have been reworked significantly in Radarr V3 (Aphrodite). They are now calculated on-the-fly instead of being stored in the database, so they update as soon as you change the definitions.

Conditions

All conditions have two possible modifiers:

  • Negate - the match is inverted, so the condition is satisfied if and only if the non-negated condition is not satisfied
  • Required - only applies to formats with more than one condition of the same type and changes the matching rules for type groups. Enabling this option means that this specific condition must be satisfied for the whole custom format to apply regardless of if another condition of the same type would otherwise satisfy the type group.

The conditions are:

  • Release Title - The title of the release
  • Edition - This tag is matched against any Editions Radarr may parse. You can put any value Radarr will try to match that against what it parsed (case-insensitive).
  • Language - This language is matched against any language(s) Radarr parses. All languages previously selectable in profiles work here.
  • Indexer Flag - This tag is matched against any Indexer Flags Radarr may parse.
  • Source - The source where a release was ripped from.
  • Resolution - The resolution parsed from either the release name or media info (if available).
  • Quality Modifier - Quality Modifier sets things like Telescene, Telesync, Remux, Regional. It just disambiguates a given source and resolution pair when there are multiple quality types that can apply
  • Size - This is matched against the release size. The release size is converted to gigabytes and compared against the values min and max.

Profiling Settings and Ranking

The overhaul has scrapped the linear ranking system in favor of a scoring system assigning points to releases to allow more multi-dimensional preferences. The cutoff has been replaced by a stopping score where upgrading stops once a release with this desired score has been downloaded. The "None" format is replaced simply with a score of zero while the checkboxes controlling rejection or acceptance of matched releases is now controlled by the Minimum Custom Format Score. Custom formats that match with undesirable attributes should be given a negative score to lower their appeal. Outright rejections should be given a negative score low enough that even if all of the other formats with positive scores were added, the score would still fall below the minimum.

Community Custom Formats

Trash's Custom Formats


Indexers


Once you're here you'll be adding the indexer/tracker that you'll be using to actually download any of your files. If you're curious on how Radarr works with your indexer/tracker click HERE

Indexers

Once you've clicked the + button to add a new indexer you'll be presented with a new window with many different options. For the purposes of this wiki Radarr considers both Usenet Indexers and Torrent Trackers as "Indexers".

There are two sections here: Usenet and Torrents. Based upon what download client you'll be using you'll want to select the type of indexer you'll be going with.

More information on Indexers and Trackers can be found HERE


Usenet:

  • Newsznab - Here you'll find presets of popular usenet indexers (that are pre-filled out, all you'll need is your API key which is provided by the usenet indexer of your choice) along with the ability to create a custom Indexer
    • Regardless of if you select a pre filled out indexer or a custom indexer setup you'll be presented with a new window to input all your settings
    • Name - This is where you'll select a unique name - typically you'd want to put the indexer name that you're using
    • Enable RSS - Enable this indexer for monitoring the RSS feed for new future releases
    • Enable Automatic Search - Enable this indexer for when you trigger an automatic search or have Radarr search
    • Enable Interactive Search - Enable this indexer for when you trigger an interactive search
    • URL -
    • API Path (advanced option) - Path to the api, usually /api
    • API Key - Self Explanatory
    • Categories (advanced option) - Comma Separated list of the numerical categories to be scanned. Leave blank for all
    • Additional Parameters - Self Explanatory
    • [ADD MORE HERE - WIP...some are ARR specific]
    • Multi Language -
    • Additional Parameters -
    • Remove year from search string - Should Radarr remove the year after the title when searching this indexer?

Options

  • Minimum Age - Usenet only: Minimum age in minutes of NZBs before they are grabbed. Use this to give new releases time to propagate to your usenet provider.
  • Retention - Usenet only: Set to zero to set for unlimited retention Set to zero to set for unlimited retention
  • Maximum Size - Maximum size for a release to be grabbed in MB. Set to zero to set to unlimited
  • RSS Sync Interval - Interval in minutes. Set to zero to disable (this will stop all automatic release grabbing)

This will apply to all indexers, please follow the rules set forth by them.

RSS Sync

Radarr relies on RSS feeds to automate grabbing of releases as they are posted, for both new releases as well as previously released releases being released or re-released. The RSS feed is the latest releases from a site, typically between 50 and 100 releases, though some sites provide more and some less. The RSS feed is comprised of all releases recently available, including releases for requested media you do not follow, if you look at debug logs you will see these releases being processed, which is completely normal.

The Interval

Radarr enforces a minimum of 10 minutes on the RSS Sync interval and a maximum of 2 hours. 15 minutes is the minimum recommended by most indexers, though some do allow lower intervals and 2 hours ensures Radarr is checking frequently enough to not miss a release (even though it can page through the RSS feed on many indexers to help with that). Some indexers allow clients to perform an RSS sync more frequently than 10 minutes, in those scenarios we recommend using Radarr's Release-Push API endpoint along with an IRC announce channel to push releases to Radarr for processing which can happen in near real time and with less overhead on the indexer and Radarr as Radarr doesn’t need to request the RSS feed too frequently and process the same releases over and over.

Radarr has been offline

If Radarr has been offline for an extended period of time, Radarr will attempt to page back to find the last release it processed in an attempt to avoid missing a release. As long as your indexer supports paging and it hasn’t been too long Radarr will be able to process the releases it would have missed and avoid you needing to perform a search for the missed episodes.

  • Prefer Indexer Flags:
  • Availability Delay:
  • Whitelisted Subtitle Tags:
  • Allow Hardcoded Subs:

Restrictions

Download Clients


Download Clients

Completed Download Handling

Failed Download Handling

Remote Path Mappings

Connect


Connections

Metadata


Metadata

Options

Tags


General


Host

Security

Proxy

Logging

Analytics

Updates

Backups

UI

Calendar

First Day of Week
Week Column Header

Movies

Runtime Format

Dates

Short Date Format
Long Date Format
Time Format
Show Relative Dates

Style

Enable Color-Impaired Mode

Altered style to allow color-impaired users to better distinguish color coded information

Language

UI Language

Language that Radarr will use for the UI


This page was last edited on 10 September 2020, at 21:15. Content is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike unless otherwise noted.